BrewDog, the Scottish brewer, is eyeing Leeds, Birmingham and Sheffield for its next craft beer bar openings. The company announced today that it plans to open at least five new bars and a new £7m brewery in 2012 after raising almost £2m from “fans” via a share issue. BrewDog currently operates three bars, in Aberdeen, Glasgow and Edinburgh. A site in Camden, London, is set to open next month. The company has already secured its next outlets in Newcastle and Manchester; the latter site is set to open in spring 2012. BrewDog co-founder James Watt told M&C Report: “We are also in negotiation on a venue in Leeds and we’re looking at options in Birmingham and Sheffield.” Watt said the company is ideally looking for venues that are already licensed, with leaseholds preferred. Opening of its Camden site on Bayham Street has been delayed because the outlet was unlicensed. Under its Equity for Punks scheme, launched in July, the company has been offering members of the public the chance to buy shares in the company online - BrewDog made 90,000 shares available to buy in £95 packages. Just over £1m was raised in the first month and the campaign is set to continue until the end of the year. The new brewery in Balmacassie, just outside Aberdeen, is set to increase brewing capacity from around 25,000 to 200,000 hectolitres, and is billed as being low carbon and better for the environment. Planning permission has been submitted for the site. BrewDog has also bought the land opposite for possible future expansion. Watt said: “BrewDog has grown by over 200% in 2011, and through the investment of BrewDog fans throughout the world in Equity for Punks we are planning on exceeding that growth in 2012. “The new facility will give us 10 times the brewing capacity, allowing us to meet demand that is growing all the time. In addition to this, we have plans in place to open at least five new craft beer bars over the next 12 months. “Through their investment in BrewDog, craft beer fans are helping to shake the dust from the UK drinks industry and spark a craft beer revolution. Craft beer fans are not only turning their backs on the limp, pale yellow lagers mass-produced and peddled by giant global breweries, they are also becoming richer with every craft beer they drink.”