The UK has been labelled the "binge drinking" capital of Europe, after new research found that 12% of the population admitted to consuming up to 10 drinks on a night out. A European-wide study found that although the British were not the EU's most regular drinkers – only consuming alcohol an average of four times a week – they drank the most in one session. The research, by Eurobarometer, the polling firm, found British drinkers consume more in one session than any other of the EU's 27 nations. Only the Maltese and the Finnish could match the quantity of drink consumed at a single sitting, with one in ten drinking the same quantity as the British. A spokesman for Eurobarometer in Brussels said: "Europe is the region with the highest per capita alcohol consumption in the world, and Britain tops the league for the largest volumes drank in single sessions. "The high level of drinking brings with it a high level of harm, in the form of social disorder and injury. "In the European Union, harmful and hazardous alcohol consumption is also the third largest risk factor for ill health, responsible for 195,000 deaths each year. "The estimated economic cost is in the region of £100 bn - £125 bn across the whole EU." The survey was commissioned by the European Commission and was carried out TNS Opinion, who interviewed 18,000 people across Europe over the past three months. Chris Sorek, chief executive of Drinkaware, the alcohol awarenewss charity, commenting on the findings said: “It’s worrying, but unfortunately unsurprising, to see the UK has one of the highest levels of binge drinking in the European Union. There is no doubt that our drinking culture needs to be urgently addressed. “The drinking habits of under-18s and young adults are a very real problem in this country. Education has a key role in changing people’s relationship with drinking. “While many people are aware of the damage drinking to excess could cause to their liver, it’s important people also recognise that drinking above the daily guidelines can lead to a range of other serious long-term health harms such as cancer, stroke and depression.”