Meat and milk from cloned cattle and their offspring is safe to consume, independent scientists have said. The Advisory Committee on Novel Foods and Processes said this morning that it believed the food was unlikely to present any risk. The Food Standards Agency (FSA) will discuss the conclusions in December before providing further advice to ministers. However, the committee's scientists said there was no substantial difference between meat and milk from cloned animals and produce from conventional livestock, in line with a number of other scientific assessments. FSA chief scientist Andrew Wadge said: "The Advisory Committee on Novel Foods and Processes has confirmed that meat and milk from cloned cattle and their offspring shows no substantial difference to conventionally produced meat and milk, and therefore is unlikely to present a food safety risk." In the US, South America and Asia, farmers can breed from cloned cows, sheep and pigs in order to increase milk and meat production. However, farmers in Europe who want to introduce the products of cloned animals into the food chain require specific authorisation because they are considered "novel foods".